Category Archives: Call me Segmented: Arthropoda & Insecta

Ghosts in the Salal

It all started for me when my neighbor, with glee, presented the animated salal leaf she found while gardening. My first thought: “How funny! My second thought, “What insect did this?”  I ran through scenarios in my mind: a variety … Continue reading

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Bees, Please!

Savvy gardeners are learning how important bees and other pollinators are to a healthy and abundant garden.  A healthy garden is a balanced eco-system with plentiful habitat for beneficial insects. We can say “Bees, Please!” by limiting our  pesticide use, … Continue reading

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Great Golden Digger Wasp–Beneficial Insect

Its hard not to notice an inch long wasp, let alone 5 or 6 flitting from flower to flower around you in the garden. Last week while weeding I was mesmerized by the imposing wasps clambering over the allium flower spheres. Each … Continue reading

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Winter bloomers for Beneficial Insects

  Today I took advantage of a break in the rainy weather and went out to pull shotweed.  The Sarcococca and white forsythia (Abeliophyllum distichum) were perfuming the damp air.  Both shrubs had a barely perceptible cloud of tiny flies … Continue reading

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Lady Beetle: Queen of the Beneficial Insects

I have always been fascinated with insects and am always on the lookout for them.  Since I garden using least toxic methods, the balance of good and bad insects is key to pest control.  A healthy garden will have it’s share of … Continue reading

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Late Summer Pleasures–On the Order of Odonata

In late summer, early fall, the air over our pond resembles Hartsfield-Jackson International Airport.  The dragonflies, damselflies and skimmers–all of the insect order Odonata, maneuver deftly over the water.  Some 430 species of Odonata are found in the US and … Continue reading

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Attracting Native Pollinators–PERENNIAL BOOKWORM

Attracting Native Pollinators: The Xerces Society Guide to Protecting North America’s Bees and Butterflies.  The Xerces Society, 2011.  Storey Publishing, 384 pages, 10 x 7″, $29.95 (paper). This is a wonderful guide that I’d recommend to anyone.  It’s comprehensive and … Continue reading

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Spittlebugs Galore–Garden Pests

Most of the time in the late spring when the spittlebugs are on my garden plants, I don’t pay them any notice.  They normally show up on tender new shoots in April or May.  Of course, the dripping, foaming mass … Continue reading

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Tracking the Woollybear at Theler Wetlands

This is a lovely time of year to get out for a hike.  On Saturday, we took some friends visiting from California out to the Theler Wetlands trails at the head of Hood Canal.  We enjoyed patches of warm sunshine … Continue reading

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Great Book on Bees, Wasps and Ants–Perennial Bookworm

Bees, Wasps and Ants: The Indispensable Role of Hymenoptera in Gardens, Eric Grissell, 2010.  Timber Press, Inc., 335 pages, 9” x 6”, $27.95 (hardcover). Most books about bees just drone on, losing me in the second chapter when they start … Continue reading

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