GOT THE SPRING BLUES–PLANT FIX

Brunnera macrophylla 'Variegata'

Pulsatilla in a cloud of Mexican hair grass

The blues is alright in my garden.  If you like blue flowers (who doesn’t?), this is your season.  My woodland areas are in their glory right now, and many of the shade loving stars are blue flowering–Corydalis, Omphalodes, Brunnera, just to name a few.  These plants shine amongst the pastels of bleeding heart, Tiarella and hellebore.

For sunny beds, spring bulbs provide reliable blue hues, echoing the clear skies we enjoy after stormy Monday.  Muscari (grape hyacinth)  is one of the bulbs still doing it’s thing.  The Chionodoxa (glory of the snow), Pushkinia (striped squill) and Ipheion (star flower) finished up last week after a month of blooms.

perfect pair: Muscari and 'Angelina' sedum

In my mind, a spoonful of these saturated blues are the ultimate partner for bright daffodils and yellow flowering Epimedium.  Blue and yellow is my favorite garden color combination; throw in some white flowers, and that’s my idea of Eden

Blue flowers go with anything but combine particularly well with golden foliage.  In spring that means Sedum ‘Angelia’, gold leafed bleeding heart, the evergreen Carex with creamy yellow stripes and a backdrop of golden barberry fresh with new, acid-toned leaves.

Lathyrus vernus (spring vetchling)

As the muddy waters dry up, summer will bring a few blue flowers for punctuation, but the yellows, oranges and reds steal the scene.  By autumn, there will be blue again as monkshood, Lobelia, and plumbago accompany the blazing tones of deciduous shrubs and trees ready to transition to dormancy.

Ah spring garden! You have me preaching the blues.

© Colleen Miko, 2012

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About Colleen Miko

Colleen Miko is a certified professional horticulturist with 20 years experience in landscape design who has designed award winning gardens for the NW Flower & Garden Show as well as HGTV’s “Landscaper’s Challenge”. Colleen is freelance garden writer and speaker.
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